estado futuro 2016: innovación para las personas [future state 2016: innovation for the people]
30 & 31 March 2016, Santiago, Chile

On March 30-31st 2016 in Santiago, Chile, the Laboratorio de Gobierno of the Chilean Government and the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) hosted Future State: Innovation for the People, an international public innovation conference.

Future State 2016 was primarily open to public sector practitioners, social entrepreneurs and civil society organisations working in the field of public sector innovation. The core of the discussion was on citizen-focused innovation, labs, and the challenges of enabling innovation in the public sector. To imagine how our states and governments should be in the future, we need to start from the people: Future State is an invitation to citizens, civil servants, politicians, academics and entrepreneurs to think together the future of public services.

How to support innovation processes in the public sector to be centred in people’s collaboration and with the focus on creating public value? Where are the best examples of this kind of innovations? What are the barriers and challenges to innovate within the state? What are the institutions we need to create for these tasks? What capabilities we need to develop? What is the value we give to technology and new knowledge? Which role to citizen participation? Which to the private sector?

Future State aims to be a space to debate these questions with the perspective of envisioning states and governments willing to change, creators of spaces of collaboration and opportunities to innovate, fostering that citizens and civil servants can develop the capabilities to think, create and implement public services with real impact on people’s lives.

You can find more details of the agenda and the sessions on this page, and immediately below you can read a summary report from the event (in Spanish only). On the right-hand side of the page you will find the introductory address from President Michelle Bachelett, and presentations from the different sessions of the conference.

Day 1: 30 March 2016

What is the imperative for innovation in the public sector and the resulting challenges for government? The conference was opened with three senior speakers, including the President of Chile, to provide an overall frame for the activities and discussions at the conference. The session was moderated by Rodrigo Egaña, Director of the Civil Service, Chile.

Speakers:

  • Michelle Bachelet, President of the Republic of Chile
  • Jorge Burgos, Minister of the Interior and Public Security, Chile
  • Mari Kiviniemi, Deputy Secretary General, OECD
President Bachelet addressed the conference via video, you can watch her video below or in the sidebar on the right-hand side of the page:
Public innovation as a way to restore public confidence by integrating them in the creation of public policies. What is the current role of innovation in the public sector and why is it relevant?

Building on existing practical experience, this panel discussion focused on identifying the potential benefits of innovation in the public sector while discussing the main challenges for innovation in the Chilean public sector, the Latin American region and other OECD countries. The panel explored the diverse perspectives that feed the debate on public innovation today, and with the aim of strengthening the capacities to innovate by establishing the true importance of sharing knowledge between countries

The session was moderated by Rodrigo Egaña, Director of the Civil Service, Chile.

Speakers:

  • Luiz de Mello, Deputy Director, Public Governance and Territorial Development Directorate, OECD
  • Eduardo Bitran, Executive Vice President of CORFO, Chile
The third session of the conference comprised four parallel sessions under the theme Innovation for citizens. The parallel sessions provided discussions on four complementary agendas for public innovation. Each discussion was experience-based and citizen focussed through the use of case studies of successful innovation projects.

The role of citizens: participation and social inclusion. Innovation for, by and with the people.

Increasingly educated and informed citizens expect greater participation in the decisions made by governments. More inclusive governance models and decision-making processes can help overcome power asymmetries that today lead to unequal outcomes. More participatory operations and processes can allow governments to open space for the collective creation of ideas, information and capacities that can lead to better public policies and services for citizens. From the governments’ point of view, these are increasingly constrained by limited resources – whether financial, information or capacity – to solve highly complex problems such as increasing inequality. To respond effectively to these challenges, they must find innovative and more collaborative forms of public action. This discussion session addressed the innovation potential of more participatory solutions to develop services and public policies that allow to improve inclusion and social cohesion.

This discussion session was moderated by Danae Mlynarz, Head of Division for Public-Private Co-operation, Ministry of Social Development

Panelists:

  • Françoise Waintrop, Deputy Head of Interministerial Modenisation Strategies, Secrétariat général pour la modernisation de l’action publique (SGMAP), France
  • Jesper Christiansen, Nesta
  • Carolina Pozo, Executive Director, Innovation Laboratory, LINQ, Ecuador
  • Josefa Errázuriz, Mayor of Providencia, Chile
Cities as space for innovation

Cities that are more connected to intelligent and sustainable socio-economic organizations should be geared towards producing greater social cohesion and increasing the well-being of the urban population. The world’s population is increasingly urban — in Latin America 79.6% of the population lives in cities, being the most urbanized region in the world after North America. These demographic trends present an important organizational challenge in delivering quality services that increase living standards in Latin American cities. However, they also open great opportunities, such as the potential to deliver economies of scale or the high concentration of talent, elements that can increase productivity exponentially. This session focused on discussing the necessary conditions – infrastructure, systems, capabilities and services – to turn emerging cities into poles of innovation, aspiring to higher standards of living, intelligent and sustainable socio-economic organizations, greater social cohesion and Welfare of the urban population in general.

This discussion session was moderated by Alejandro Gutiérrez, Head of the Strategic Programme for Sustainable Construction, CORFO, Chile.

Panelists:

  • James Anderson, Head of the Innovation Programme at Bloomberg Philanthropies, United States of America
  • Marco Stienberg, Founder and Director of Snowcone & Haystack, Finland
  • Claudio Orrego, Intendant of the Metropolitan Region of Santiago, Chile
  • Danièl Jadue, Mayor of Recoleta, Chile
Social-digital innovation: new techologies for citizen services

Citizens are increasingly connected, and their experiences with private services are making them seek more convenient, easy and friendly access to public services. How could governments leverage the use of technology to design and deliver better services? How can the digital age enable innovative and collaborative public services that achieve the expected impact? The maturity of the use of digital technologies and the use of approaches to user-centered service design is increasingly changing how the public sector designs and delivers better quality services, shifting from government-centric services to user-centered services And their needs.

This discussion session was moderated by Barbara Ubaldi, Project Manager for Digital Government, OECD.

Panelists:

  • Louise Palludan Kampmann, Head of Division of the Center for User Experience and Implementation, Denmark
  • Nicholas Wise, Executive Director of the Community Service and Enabling Division, Government of Canada
  • Rudi Borrman, Undersecretary of Public Innovation, Presidency of the Argentine Nation
  • Jorge Alzamora, Head of the Modernization and Digital Government Unit, Ministry General Secretariat of the Presidency, Chile
Open Government: Participation, collaboration, transparency and open data

The perception of inadequate levels of transparency, accountability and participation increases the risk of mistrust in governments. To mitigate this risk, there are a number of innovations today that are helping governments foster new and more direct interactions between the public sector and citizens, helping to build trust in institutions. Approaches enabled by technology, such as the opening of public data increasing transparency and accountability, allowing the empowerment of citizens to become agents of change and social control. This improvement of social control creates incentives for governments to improve their performance. Progress in access and governance of information and communication can help governments to engage with diverse actors and thus stimulate participation in political processes. However, opening the data and information requires more careful and strategic management by public institutions to preserve privacy and security. Data management in the public sector should aim to maximize its impact on the effectiveness of public services and policies, promote the creation of economic and social value, and strengthen social responsibility and transparency of the Government.

This discussion session was moderated by Rodrigo Mora, President of the Public Defender Commission (CDC), Ministry of the General Secretariat of the Presidency, Chile.

Panelists:

  • Enrique Zapata Pérez, Public Innovation of the Presidency of the Republic, Mexico
  • Álvaro Ramírez Alujas, Consultant on Open Government, ECLAC
  • Carlos Vignolo, Director of the Innovation, Socio-technology and Education Program, Faculty of Engineering, University of Chile
  • Danilo Sturiza, Chief of the Citizen and Institutions Department, Modernization and Digital Government Unit, Ministry of the General Secretariat of the Presidency, Chile
The fourth session of the conference consisted of a series of practical workshops that providing opportunities to explore methods and processes for public sector innovation.

Immersion Methods for Innovation in the Public Sector: Working with Public Officials.

Workshop led by Stéphane Vincent, Executive Director, La 27éme Région, France.

The experience of users, public officials and citizens is the starting point to imagine the administration and public policies of the future.

La 27éme Région is defined as a “laboratory for public transformation” working with public administrations to change the way they design policies. Through research-action programs, the organization tests methods and knowledge of design, creative design, social sciences (sociology, ethnography, participant observation) and amateur activities (do-it-yourself and popular education).

Building on this experience, the workshop focused on the “immersion approach” that has its residency program to innovate with public officials throughout France.

Workshop 2: Enhancing civil service capabilities for managing innovation and Workshop 3: Capabilities for innovation — learning by doing

The OECD Public Sector Innovation Observatory (OPSI) and Nesta (UK) are developing a research project whose objective is to identify and analyze the skills and competencies needed to innovate in the public sector. This research aims to establish a general framework of skills and competencies for public sector innovation, which can assist governments in their efforts to integrate these capabilities in the management of people; Inform recruitment, professional development and training opportunities; And encourage more distributed models of work and collaborative leadership.

The first component of the project seeks to establish a sort of inventory of such skills and competences from a series of interviews with people involved in projects, initiatives and innovation units. The purpose of these two workshops was to test and discuss this inventory. The results of this interactive session will be used to develop and refine the overall framework and to develop learning tools for civil servants and other public employees.

Workshop 2 was led by Daniel Gerson, Project Manager for Public Employment and Management, OECD.

Workshop 3 was led by Bas Leurs, Head of Learning Experience, Ability to Innovate, Nesta, UK.

Prototyping public services.

Workshop led by Thomas Prehn, Managing Director, MindLab, Denmark.

There is a consensus today on the need to improve the design and usability of public services. Using design methods can help public authorities understand users’ needs and preferences, helping them develop more efficient, usable, and user-friendly solutions. Some elements of design, such as prototyping, can help public institutions test new solutions in faster, more agile ways and at the same time manage risks more effectively.

MindLab has established itself as one of the world leaders of innovation units in the public sector. This workshop presented MindLab’s approach to prototyping, highlighting the role it can play in the development of more innovative public services and improving the sector’s innovative capabilities.

Building transformative capacity in government

Workshop led by Marco Steinberg, Founder of Snowcone & Haystack, Finland.

Governments and cities around the world are facing unprecedented pressure to do more radically with less. Demographic growth, fiscal austerity, social inequality, and demographic changes are just some of the forces that put extraordinary pressures on the public sector to transform. In the “more for less” mission, the focus is shifting from improving existing solutions to the need to fundamentally redesign new approaches and strategies. How can we redesign the government’s own capabilities? And how do we do it without interrupting the provision of continuous and reliable services?

This workshop was based on the experience of Snowcone & Haystack to explore different strategies and capacity for transformation.

Open innovation in public procurement

Workshop led by Roman Yosif, Deputy Director of Ecosystems and Investments, Laboratorio de Gobierno, Chile.

No one has a monopoly on information, ideas, skills or abilities. The challenges of open innovation can help governments to seek – both internal and
Externally – innovative solutions to address relevant public interest challenges. Governments are in a unique position to identify and support innovative initiatives, expand their scale and provide political and public experience. Drawing on the experience of the Laboratorio de Gobierno with its Impacta and Aulab programs, this workshop focused on how governments can effectively use the challenges of open innovation to solve public problems.

The innovation agenda in the public sector: the challenge for Latin America and Chile. Social coordination and institutional design to give sustainability to changes over time.

In this panel discussion, the speakers shared their thoughts and observations on the biggest challenges for Chile and Latin America to stimulate innovation in the public sector. This panel had the objective of sharing visions and observations on the main future challenges for Chile and Latin America in the promotion of innovation in the public sector. It was discussed how to support “a new methodology of change” and how to anticipate the demands, build resilient countries and transform innovation in the public sector into a support to meet the challenge of innovating in the region.

The session was moderated by Juan Felipe López, Executive Director, Laboratorio de Gobierno, Chile.

Speakers:

  • Matthew Taylor, Executive Director Royal Society for the Promotion of Arts, Manufactures and Trade (RSA), UK
  • Mario Marcel, Counselor, Central Bank of Chile

Day 2: 31 March 2016

Challenges to innovate in the public sector: requirements, benefits and approaches to innovate creating public value. Realizing innovation in the public sector requires a dynamic ecosystem, including appropriate institutional frameworks and enablers; Incentives and flows of information; And skills, ideas and resources. What are the challenges for creating an ecosystem that encourages and drives innovation?

The second day of the conference was opened with a plenary that discussed how the speakers respective organizations are facing the challenges of innovation and what are the key factors that must be addressed for the Chilean and Latin American context.

The session was moderated by Nicolas Rebolledo, Leader of the Platform for Public Innovation at the Royal College of Art School of Design, UK..

Speakers:

  • Geoff Mulgan, Executive Director, Nesta, UK
  • Gonzalo Rivas, President of the Council for Innovation for Development, Chile
The second session of this day of the conference comprised four parallel discussion sessions under the theme Challenges to support and enable innovation. The parallel sessions provided discussions across four dimensions: institutions, complexity of services, capabilities, investment.

Institutions, strategy and governance for an innovation agenda in the public sector.

The capacity of the public sectors to innovate is mainly determined by the governance of processes and operations in the public apparatus. In a large number of cases, these governance frameworks were designed to preserve and strengthen traditional forms of work, which are often overly hierarchical and bureaucratic. Institutional frameworks and procedures should be re-thought to incentivize innovation, manage risks and provide tools to streamline and expand successful practices. Developing a shared strategic vision that seeks to create an enabling environment for innovation can be a valuable management tool to help guide action in the public sector. Based on the concrete experiences of different countries, this working session will discuss how governance mechanisms can foster or hinder the Government’s capacity for innovation.to develop public services and policies that improve inclusion and social cohesion.

This discussion session was moderated by Enrique Paris, General Coordinator Modernization of the State, Ministry of Finance, Chile

Panelists:

  • Marco Daglio, Head of the Observatory for Innovation in the Public Sector (OPSI), OECD
  • Fernando Barraza, National Director, Internal Revenue Service, Chile
  • Silvia Da Rosa, Laboratory of Social Innovation, Uruguay
  • Enrique Zapata Pérez, Director of Public Innovation, Office of the Presidency, Mexico
New services for a new citizen: design methods for human-centred public services — innovative approaches from design provide public institutions with a new way of understanding the challenges.

One of the responses to the “imperative to innovate” that today has public sector institutions has been the implementation of government-sponsored innovation laboratories, with the aim of analyzing and implementing innovation processes using an approach Transdisciplinary and intersectoral collaboration seeks to create a new type of “experimental government” (Nesta, 2014). Most of these public sector innovation centers are using design processes and methodologies to support not only the development of new public services but also the formulation of public policies. The use of design methods is an approach, which focuses on people, is characterized by user participation and iterative development of solutions. This approach can provide public institutions with new tools to develop innovative and collaborative approaches to address complex public issues and more effective solutions.

This discussion session was moderated by Nicolás Rebolledo, Leader of the Platform for Public Innovation at the Royal College of Art School of Design, UK.

Panelists:

  • Stéphane Vincent, Executive Director, La 27e Région, France
  • Jesper Christiansen, Senior Program Officer, Capacities for Innovation, Nesta, UK
  • Juan Felipe López, Executive Director, Government Laboratory, Government of Chile
Building capacities to innovate in the public sector

What can a state do to improve its capabilities to develop and attract the skills needed to innovate in the public sector? Modernizing the public sector and improving its innovative potential requires the creation of new skills and abilities. More collaborative and innovative ways of working and shifting focus to the needs of users and their preferences, require skills to engage with internal and external actors, practical knowledge of human behavior and new methods of work, leadership and entrepreneurial skills. This session illustrated with concrete examples and experiences what governments can do to improve their capacity to innovate and develop, attract and retain the skills and talents needed to foster an innovative civil service.

This discussion session was moderated by Gianncarlo Durán, Sub Director of Capacities for Innovation, Laboratorio de Gobierno, Chile.

Panelists:

  • Daniel Gerson, Project Manager for Public Employment and Management, OECD
  • Sabine Junginger, Member of the Hertie School of Governance in Berlin and member of the MindLab Advisory Council in Denmark
  • Bas Leurs, Head of Learning Experience, Capabilities to Innovate, Nesta, UK
  • Pedro Guerra, Deputy Director of People Development, Civil Service, Chile
New public-private partnerships: innovative public investment and procurement

More collaborative and innovative ways of working and shifting focus to the needs of users and their preferences, require skills to engage with internal and external actors, practical knowledge of human behavior and new methods of work, leadership and entrepreneurial skills. This session illustrated with concrete examples and experiences what governments can do to improve their capacity to innovate and develop, attract and retain the skills and talents needed to foster an innovative civil service.

This discussion session was moderated by Andrés Zahler, Head of the Innovation Division, Ministry of Economy, Tourism and Development, Chile.

Panelists:

  • Francisco Jaime Quesado, Chairman of the Executive Board of ESPAP, Portugal
  • Sascha Haselmayer, Founder and CEO, Citymart, United States of America
  • Trinidad Inostroza, Director of ChileCompra, Ministry of Finance, Chile
  • Claudio Muñoz, President of Icare’s Marketing Circle and President of Telefónica Chile, Chile
Building an innovation agenda for Chile: strengthening an ecosystem to encourage multi-level innovation.

How can governments achieve a dynamic and sustainable ecosystem, leading to innovation in the public sector? To close the conference a ministerial panel provided a discussion on the policy recommendations to improve the capacity of the Government of Chile to innovate, highlighting the views of Ministers and Heads of Service on the main challenges and areas of priority action.

The session was moderated by Barbara Ubaldi, Project Manager, Digital Government, OECD.

Speakers:

  • Nicolás Eyzaguirre, Minister Secretary General of the Presidency, Chile
  • Luis Felipe Céspedes, Minister of Economy, Tourism and Development, Chile
  • Rodrigo Egaña, Director of the Civil Service, Chile